4th Summit of Young Elected Local and Regional Leaders

Following on from the success of the previous Summits of Young Elected Local and Regional Leaders that took place in 2017, 2018 and 2019, Renew Europe CoR group have yet again teamed up with European Liberal Youth (LYMEC) and Young Democrats for Europe (YDE) to organise a fourth in 2020. Due to the COVID-19 crisis, the event will take place online.

When?

25 September 2020

Where?

Online

Why?

To provide an opportunity for young liberal democrat local and regional elected leaders to meet and share ideas and best practice amongst themselves.

Who?

You are encouraged to apply if: 1) you are between 18 and 35; 2) you hold an elected mandate at local or regional level; and 3) you hold a position of responsibility either in government or in opposition.

How?

Apply by filling an online form.

3rd Summit of Young Elected Local and Regional Leaders

Last year, twenty young elected local democrat and liberal leaders from twelve different countries debated how to address the issue of climate change at local and regional level and also how can leadership be shown to achieve climate action. You can see the highlights from the 2nd summit which took place in 2018 here.

Therefore following on from the success of its Liberal Mayors Summits, the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe in the European Committee of the Regions (ALDE-CoR) together with LYMEC and YDE yet again teamed up to organise a 3rd Summit of Young Elected Local and Regional Leaders in 2019: in Brussels on the 20th of September.

 

When?

20 September 2019

Where?

Brussels, European Committee of the Regions

Why?

To provide an opportunity for young democrat and liberal local and regional politicians to meet and share ideas and best practice amongst themselves, and afterwards to meet with experienced local and regional politicians in a joint meeting with ALDE-CoR.

Who?

Young (18-35) local and regional politicians with an elected mandate and having a responsibility either in government or in opposition are encouraged to apply.

How?

Apply by filling an online form. When applying please indicate your elected mandate, your current position of responsibility in government or opposition, the dates these began, and your policy interests under comments. Places are limited and selection will be carried out by ALDE-CoR based on experience, and with a view to ensuring geographical, policy and gender balance. The full agenda and confirmations will be sent in August.
Deadline for applications is 19 July.
Travel arrangements and accommodation will be organized by ALDE-CoR.

Europe must engage in the food revolution!

We do not feed ourselves today as we used to eat in prior stages. We can appreciate it in the evolution of consumer practices; our food model has entered a double revolution. On this World Food Day and taking into account that the reform of the Common Agricultural Policy begins, we are calling for Europe to remain in it.

The first revolution is the link with proximity. We therefore advocate for an ambitious European policy that strengthens the link of urban populations, in ever-increasing numbers, with the agricultural activity, which is close to home. For a long time, this relationship has been denigrated by Europe in the name of the single market, which was supposed to bring down the borders and bring out a European identity. This lead to forget the transnational nature of the European agricultural lands, which existed even before the European Union was born. Alpine cheeses or the production of flax in Normandy and the Netherlands is a proof of the existence of common identities, consequence of geography and history.

We must cherish them nowadays because agricultural traditions most often correspond to a reasoned and adapted management of resources. In addition, local consumption also allows citizens to reconnect with natural laws and thus, promote product quality and seasonality.

Lastly, it makes it possible to avoid the ever-widening disparities between urban and rural areas, by raising awareness of the interdependence between them and their respective inhabitants.
To guarantee the preservation of the terroirs of Europe, we must mobilize European funds to develop short circuits, especially in cross-border areas with common culinary practices. We must also relax the European competition rules to allow collectivities and collective restaurants to buy preferably from local farmers on which they are located.

The second revolution to which Europe will have to respond is the growing demand of citizens for transparency on the composition and origin of food. Advances in medical research are leading to new discoveries every day on preferred culinary practices or products to be avoided by consumers. In this regard, we can no longer live in the reign of suspicion that sometimes discredits the profession of farmers, which we should instead value. In this sense, we should assume the ambition to build a new European Food Safety Agency that can independently carry out studies on the harmfulness of the hundreds of products currently in dispute. No one understands why the opinions given by the health authorities are based on studies conducted and paid for by large agro-food firms.

The many food scandals that have rocked the continent have also convinced citizens that want to go further in the traceability of the food they consume. Therefore, we should implement technologies such as blockchain, in order to create by 2030, the world’s first food information network. While consumers address that they are not aware of what the dishes they can purchase contain, it would ensure perfect traceability and meet the expectations for a strong food revolution that would transcend borders.

Signatures: 

Pierre Baty (Président JDem), Loris Mastromatteo (SG YDE), Mathilde Karceles (VP JDem et YDE), Begoña Garteizaurrekoa (YDE President)

and the following French MPs

Avy-Elimas Nathalie, Val-d’Oise,
Bannier Géraldine, Mayenne
Berta Philippe, Gard
Deprez-Audebert Marguerite, Pas-de-Calais
El Haïry Sarah, Loire-Atlantique, MoDem Spokeswoman
Essayan Nadia, Cher
Garcia Laurent, Meurthe-et-Moselle
Griesbeck Nathalie, MEP for Greater East (France)
Jacquier-Laforge Élodie, Isère
Lagleize Jean-Luc, Haute-Garonne
Latombe Philippe, Vendée
Luquet Aude, Seine-et-Marne
Matteï Jean-Paul, Pyrénées-Atlantiques
Michel-Kleisbauer Philippe, Var
Millienne Bruno, Yvelines
Poueyto Josy, Pyrénées-Atlantiques
Richard Ramos, Loiret
Turquois Nicolas, Vienne
Waserman Sylvain, Bas-Rhin,
Wehrling Yann, Secretary-General of MoDem

YDE Congress 2018: New Board elected!

Young Democrats for Europe have elected a new board of ten members for a two year mandate, during their Congress held in Brussels on the 30th of June 2018, led by:  Begoña Garteizaurrekoa as President, Loris Mastromatteo as Secretary General, Anita Velic as Spokesperson, and Peter Schueppenhauer as Treasurer.

Coming from more than 12 European countries, delegates and guests discussed the need of fostering democratic values within the EU, among other topics.

Begoña Garteizaurrekoa, newly elected president, pointed out that: “The Youth is not only the future of the EU, but also its present. The development of Youth’s vital projects depends on their human and social development, being crucial to build active and committed players within the society”.

During the congress, two resolutions were approved by the Young Democrats for Europe: On one hand, one on democracy and a second one on Identity, Culture and Education.

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The Young Democrats for Europe is the youth wing of the European Democratic Party and one of the youth wings of the ALDE Group. The European Democratic Party is one of the European political party officially recognised by the European Parliament.

Founded in 2007, The Young Democrats for Europe primarily seek the establishment of a stronger and more integrated Europe and embrace the core values of the European Union: democracy, freedom, equality, participation, sustainability and solidarity. Their mission is also to foster greater political involvement of the European youth and raise awareness on the many problems it faces, such as access to higher education, mobility and unemployment.

 

2019 elections: The end of old-school ‘politics as usual’?

The countdown to the next European Parliament elections has begun. They are an opportunity to change the way we do politics in Europe, to become more inclusive, turn under-representation into equal representation and ultimately increase the trust in our political leaders. Will European political parties accept the challenge? Luis Alvarado writes.

Luis Alvarado is the president of the European Youth Forum*.

Unsurprisingly, youth voices are already leading the way.

In a powerful and forward-thinking move, European political party youth organisations from across the political spectrum have come out strongly in support of the same goal: to create a more transparent, open and inclusive democracy.

The path we need to take to achieve this goal by the upcoming 2019 election is so indisputable that it is supported by a joint statement of the widest possible range of youth political parties; all of whom I am proud to call members of the European Youth Forum and to represent. We are breaking the cycle of how to do ‘old-school politics’.

So listen up and take note:

The answer lies in the empowerment of the current and future generations of young people, to not only have their voices heard in politics but also to be fully engaged in all aspects of decision making.

While there will be many crucial debates to come, one thing that can be universally agreed on is that for the European project to survive and thrive, young people must be at the core. This is the first pro-European generation by birth.

A generation that knows no borders or barriers and understands that the challenges of this era can only be solved together. Migration, terrorism, inclusive and resilient societies, the future of work and the digital revolution are challenges that no nation can find solutions to on its own.

Instead, they need to be tackled regionally and globally. Young people understand this.

It’s no secret that across Europe, young people are less likely to participate in traditional manifestations of democracy, including voting in elections. However, the ‘apathetic youth’ stereotype is a myth that has already been debunked time and time again. Young people have proven themselves to be active in society, engaged and ready to create change.

We take action on issues that directly impact us and stand up for causes that we believe in. We saw that in the Scottish referendum and the UK general election – where young people said “enough!”. So no more excuses.

If political parties want to be responsive to new social movements, we encourage them to work with young people: to take account of them in their manifestos, target them in their policies and put more young people forward in elections.

Let’s start with the integration of a youth perspective. Simply throwing in some statistics now and again on youth unemployment doesn’t count. Parties need to really reflect the realities of young people in Europe and to make issues facing youth a real priority.

This means actively reaching out to young people and ensuring that young voices are meaningfully included. Placing more young candidates in electable positions, for example, has the potential to promote youth turnout and also gives voters new choices with much needed fresh perspectives and approaches.

Political party youth organisations are united in demanding that political systems, both at the national and European level, ‘youth up’ and become much more accessible to all. There is so much potential to channel citizen engagement beyond traditional voting including the opportunities presented by digitalisation, such as e-governance and e-democracy.

We don’t want to be only at the receiving end of strategies and actions, we want to be partners in developing them.

We need our political leaders to think ahead: to invest in the personal and social development of young people and society. Introducing citizenship education that allows each and every young person to develop the skills and knowledge needed to become informed, responsible and critical citizens is key to safeguarding our democracy.

The Erasmus+ programme offers amazing opportunities to contribute to the personal, social, political and economic development of youth and their communities. Imagine if all young people had the chance to experience these benefits? SPOILER ALERT: We’ve pledged to increase its budget by 10 with our #ERASMUSx10 campaign.

The sooner Europe recognises youth as a resource for transformative change, the better. We’ve had enough of being left out of decisions that will directly impact our lives. Young people’s future has already been put at risk by short-term thinking and unsustainable solutions.

Today’s economic and political system does not work for our planet or for people, especially young people. We need to be ambitious in implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and we need Europe to be a leader in combating climate change in Europe and globally.

Political parties rarely come together to join forces for a common cause. However, the next European Parliament elections in 2019 have to be more than ‘politics as usual’. Youth organisations have recognised this fact and have shown themselves to be ready and willing to work towards a stronger European future together.

For political parties and candidates to write off young generations, or ignore this joint call for action, would fail not only for youth but democracy as a whole.

*The op-ed was published in Euractiv on the 7th of Februay (https://www.euractiv.com/section/elections/opinion/2019-elections-the-end-of-old-school-politics-as-usual/) endorsed by European Liberal Youth (LYMEC), Federation of Young European Greens (FYEG), Young Democrats for Europe (YDE), Young European Federalists (JEF), European Democrat Students (EDS), International Federation of Liberal Youth (IFLRY), European Free Alliance Youth (EFAy), Youth of the European People’s Party (YEPP), Young European Socialists (YES) and International Union of Socialist Youth (IUSY).

Young Democrats for Europe (YDE)
Jeunes Democrates Europeens (JDE)
YDE is the youth wing of the European Party.We embrace the key role of democratic principles, underlined in the Lisbon Treaty and shrined in our political belief: democracy, freedom, equality, participation, sustainability and solidarity.

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